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Little Moreton Hall is a National Trust property in Cheshire, about an hour’s drive from Liverpool.

It was built by successive generations of the de Moreton family between the years 1450 and 1580. The immense weight of the gritstone roof has meant that the house has “settled” over the years – this is particularly noticeable on the top floor of this, the south range of the house.

The earliest part of the house is the Great Hall, which would have been the focus of estate life in the late medieval and early Tudor period.

Most of the furniture has been lost but this table was built for this room and remains today.

The rooms tend to lead off one from the other, there are no long hallways or corridors. In this room the wall paintings were discovered in 1976 when the wood panelling was removed for repair. The paintings feature fake wood panelling and biblical stories.

In this room the only part of the building which is level is the mantelpiece.

On the top floor, the Long Gallery undulates quite comically. Engineers have had to put steel reinforcing into the building’s frame to save it from collapse.

At either end of the Long Gallery are lovely examples of plasterwork.

From the windows in the Long Gallery you can see the courtyard and the north range of the house.

We viewed a weaving demonstration.

The ultimate Tudor status symbol – an indoor toilet called a garderobe. This room would also be used to air your clothes – the ammonia fumes from the pit below would help keep clothes moths away.

You wouldn’t want to fall in. The garderobe drained out into the moat.

In the courtyard you can admire the gabled roof over the two sets of bay windows.

The carpenter has carved an inscription right across the top.

We stopped in the Little Tearoom for tea and scones. Yum.

We had a walk around the gardens. This is the knot garden, based upon an Elizabethan garden design.

It was a glorious day. The bunting is up ready for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee next week.

Here is the moat.

Spring lambs!

People making the most of the warm weather. We stopped for an ice cream before heading home.

 

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